"The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious-the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science." Albert Einstein

Monday, April 21, 2014

NASTERNIUMS BULB ONIONS RED PEPPERS

 
Felt like making some images today but outside it was drizzly and grey so I decided to do some tabletop work and cook something at the same time. In the top image are some bulb onions and red peppers. Onions were fried in EVOO and the red pepper was cooked directly on the burner with real flames. 
Shot with a Nikon D80 at ISO 100 in manual mode. f4.8 with the lens set to 60/90, FX/DX.
 Lighting was just diffused window light from behind, a small 150watt uncorrected fresnel from the left and a small pocket LED flashlight barely raking the black wood just out of frame.

 
Some nasterniums taken yesterday from our Easter tablescape. (always wanted to use the word tablescape in a sentence) Again the D80 in aperture priority at f5.6, ISO 400, shot outdoors in natural light.  Cloudy and soft. Lens at 125/187mms FX/DX.
 
Hope you had a wonderful weekend.
 
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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

A DRAGON IN MY BONNET

 
I really enjoyed my photo session yesterday morning with the bluebonnets. I decided to go back to the same spot and try something a little different. With the old Nikkor 50mm lens opened to the max of  f1.4 I knew focus would be soft, my depth of field would be the width of a whisper,  and the bokeh would be intense. The images were totally bokehed out.
 
 
 
I concentrated mainly on the juxtapositioning of colors - let the focus go - and like Monet just get an impression.
 
BTW - I am not standing taking these nor kneeling..I'm flat on my stomach stretched out and using my elbows to prop up the camera. The area where I was shooting had little walking paths so I could lie mostly in the paths and not crush anything. I was very aware of protecting what was there so my selection of spots was limited. 

 
At one point I was visited by this dragonfly. I obviously didn't seem to bother him. Maybe because I was prone and  was already lying there very quiet. 
 
The light was very diffused this morning adding to the difference from yesterday's images.
 
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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

HAIL HAIL THE BLUEBONNETS OF APRIL

 
A few posts ago, I mentioned that because of lack of rain the bluebonnets looked kinda wimpy.
Well, bite my sassy tongue. With the heavy downpour  of the last few days and then existentially speaking flowers being just another form of water - bada bing - the bluebonnets have shot up from about four inches to a healthy sun grabbing foot or more. 

 
So I went out this morning to try my hand at interpreting this phenomenon of water captured in blue.  

 
This time I used my D7000 with the same lens as yesterday's walk...the ancient Nikkor 50mm which is a non-CPU lens, meaning it doesn't talk to the camera -  so all camera settings are set manually.
 I love the way the glass in this lens paints the light on the sensor.

                                                             ©2014 Andy deBruyn
 
I used ISO 100 and white balance set to sun. The nonCPU doesn't record the f stops
so I have no record of them.
 
Click images for bigger.
 
All images ©2014 Andy deBruyn
 
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Monday, April 14, 2014

GREEN GREEN THE GRASS THEY SAY







 
"Green green the grass they say is on the far side of the hill..." words from a Christy Minstrels tune.
 
What's with all this green? I guess if you walk through a very verdant wood next to streams and ponds...in the rain to boot...in April...you're going to see a lot of green. The freshness and newness of it all was overwhelming. The soundtrack was deep throated thunder rolling across the sky and cracking sometimes near and sometimes afar. 

Images from this morning's walk using my Nikon D70 (a 2007 digital camera) using a Nikkor 50mm lens that's about 40 years old.

"The force that through the green fuse drives the flower
Drives my green age; that blasts the roots of trees
Is my destroyer.
And I am dumb to tell the crooked rose
My youth is bent by the same wintry fever." 
Dylan Thomas

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Friday, April 11, 2014

AN IMAGE FOR FRIDAY

 
This week has been pretty busy not only with a couple of corporate photo gigs but just the minutia of  keeping the house in order. There's a saying in Italian, "Si tira avanti" - " literal translation is "we're pulling forward" - colloquial meaning is more like "we're getting by and looking to the future" - or in 60's hippy speak, "we're just trucking down the road" That's probably more like it.
 
 I looked at some images I made last year in April. I posted a couple from this session last year but not this particular one.   Other than some color saturation this one is pretty much right from the camera. Seen bigger,  the cacti look very menacing, like a huge Venus Fly Trap about to swallow it's nearby neighbor.
Next three days I'm on assignment so new images will have to wait.
 
Taken with the D7000 with Aperture Priority at f9. ISO 320 gave me a ss of 1/320th and -0.3 exposure comp. Shot with a 35mm(DX) 52mm(FX).
 
Click image for bigger.
 
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Monday, April 7, 2014

EYE TRAVEL

 
Posting this after midnight. A good example for eye travel. I made this image just before going into the Blanton. Looking southwest towards the UT campus.
 
The fact that it just rained helps the saturation of colors and the dark/light brown of the tree bark.
And judging by the dark color of the bark the wind was blowing from the southeast.
 
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INFLUENCES

 
I believe I posted this a couple of years ago. I was looking thru some files to pick out specific influences to eventually put together in it's own file. And figure out what I'm going to do
with them once I've collected enough----? 
Here we have a woodsy scene, sylvan, crammed with all sorts of vibrant trees, plants, shrubs, and flowers.
My biggest influence here is Aaron Siskind who was a revelation of sorts to me back in the seventies. Aaron was making a lot of images that emphasized the 2 dimensionality of the actual presentation medium we were using...precisely paper and walls. Usually photographers take great pains to replicate or simulate the 3 D look of the world but Aaron was taking things and flattening them out.

So in this image I see his influence along with many of the landscape painters I love from Hudson River School (Cole, Church, Durand, etc) - especially Dennis Miller Bunker. (The Pool 1889)

 For illustration
If it weren't for the inclusion of the sky this image would be like the one above.

 
Again, the inclusion of the sky defeats the 2 D feel.
 
Not too sure what I just wrote made any sense but I'm working on it.
 
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